Skin Cancer Unit

Melanoma and skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, have increased for several decades, and one in four people will have one or more of these tumors at some point in their lives.

Melanoma, meanwhile, doubles the number of new cases every approximately 15 years.

This makes people, health agents and government agencies increasingly aware of this problem and focus their efforts not only on treatment, but on prevention and early detection.

What should a person do to take care of their skin health in relation to cancer?

Protect yourself from the sun, refer to a doctor if skin lesions appear, and even in the absence of these, go periodically to the dermatologist for a check up. The professional will asses you according to your age, skin type, family and personal history, which is the appropriate what frequency for these types of consultations.

What can I expect if I am diagnosed with skin cancer?

Any clinical diagnosis will be supported by a biopsy of the lesion. In many cases, as in some basal cell carcinomas, this biopsy will be enough to find the healing method required. In more advanced tumors and in other types such as (spinocellular, melanoma), surgery is the will be the choice of treatment. Some will also require treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or the combination of these.

Dr. Pablo Boixeda and his colleagues have been studying for years the application of laser treatment for certain basal cell carcinomas with surprising results, which could revolutionize the treatment of these tumors in the future.


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